Court News Ohio
Court News Ohio
Court News Ohio

Two Ohio Courthouses Recognized for Energy Savings

Image of The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse in Cleveland and the Nathanial R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Youngstown

The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse (top) and the Nathanial R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (bottom) were among seven federal courthouses recognized by the EPA for energy savings..

Image of The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse in Cleveland and the Nathanial R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Youngstown

The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse (top) and the Nathanial R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (bottom) were among seven federal courthouses recognized by the EPA for energy savings.

Two Ohio Courthouses were recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s 2012 Energy Star National Building Competition. The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse in Cleveland and the Nathanial R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Youngstown were among seven federal courthouses that reduced their energy consumption by more than 20 percent and saved taxpayers more than $615,500.

The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse saw a 26.7 percent reduction in energy consumption, which was attained through several projects including replacing light bulbs with low wattage fluorescent bulbs, reducing air handler run times, and adding occupancy sensors in courtrooms. The building opened in 1910 and at that time housed the U.S. Post Office, District Court, and Circuit Court. The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) operates both Ohio buildings.

“The energy reductions at the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse saved more than $132,000, and we are finding more ways to bring down costs across our portfolio and deliver better value to the American people,” said Ann P. Kalayil, GSA’s Great Lakes regional administrator.

┬áThe Nathaniel R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse saw more than a 20.4 percent reduction in energy consumption for $23,700 in savings. It saved money by replacing outdoor lights with energy-efficient LED lights and reducing the building’s use of steam. The facility was built in 2002.

More than 3,000 buildings across the county competed to save energy and money. This is the third year EPA has conducted the Energy Star competition. The competitors tracked their monthly energy consumption and compared their energy use from 2011. Competitors saved a total of $50 million on utilities bills in 2012.

Howard M. Metzenbaum photo courtesy of U.S. General Services Administration; Carol M. Highsmith, photographer. Nathaniel R. Jones photo courtesy of U.S. General Services Administration; Jim Baron, Baron Photography.

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